How can I obtain a Technical Datasheet (TDS)?

You can either use the search function on this website to locate a TDS, fill out the Contact Form or call us at 888-564-9318.

How can I obtain a  SDS?

Please click the link to fill out the Contact Form or you can call us at 888-564-9318.

Where can I buy your product?

To find a distributor or Huntsman sales representative in your area, please click the link to fill out the Contact Form or you can call us at 888-564-9318.

Can I get a sample?

Yes, please click the link to fill out the Contact Form or you can call us at 888-564-9318.

Where do I find the shelf life of a product?

You can locate the shelf life of a product on the Technical Datasheet.

Can I use a product past its expiration date?

it is strongly recommended to not use a product past its expiration date as our company can only warrant the product specifications (such as gel time or viscosity) outlined on the Technical Datasheet within the shelf life period.

What is the shelf life after the container has been opened?

Please refer to the Storage Section on the Technical Datasheet. For further questions, please fill out the Contact Form or you can call us at 888-564-9318.

How are adhesive resins and hardeners properly stored?

Please refer to the Storage Section on the Technical Datasheet. For further questions, please fill out the Contact Form or you can call us at 888-564-9318.

 

The container has been left open for "x" numbers of days or weeks. Is the product still OK to use?

It is definitely not advisable to leave product containers open after use. This can affect the product specifications (such as gel time or viscosity) as outlined on the Technical Datasheet. For further questions, please fill out the Contact Form or you can call us at 888-564-9318.

How can I remove cured epoxies?

Our adhesives are designed to form permanent bonds, so removing them will be a challenge and parts can become damaged in the process. The answer is dependent on a number of factors:

  • The adhesive chemistry that has been used to bond the parts (e.g. epoxy, polyurethane, methylmethacrylates etc.
  • The size of the area that has been bonded and its configuration
  • Testing and certification
  • The substrate materials and how strong they are - whether the parts can withstand weith de-bonding process without suffering any mechanical damage
  • Sensitivity of other parts near the bond (sensitive electronics or weak plastics which could be damaged by heat or chemicals).

For removal methods, please fill out the Contact Form or you can call us at 888-564-9318.

How critical is the mix ratio?

Unless the TDS specifically indicates that deviations are acceptable, following the mix ratio is very important to ensure the resin and hardener react completely. Depending on the system, they can be more or less sensitive to deviations.

Why is the adhesive is still soft and tacky after “x” hours or days ?

There can be a number of reasons as to why the adhesive did not cure properly. Mix ratio was not followed, poor mixing of the resin and hardener, or environmental conditions (too hot or cold). It is also important to follow the proper cure schedule as outlined in the Technical Datasheet.

How can one bond Polyethylene, Polypropylene, PTFE, etc?

These low energy substrates need proper surface treatment such as corona, plasma, or flame. For further instructions, please refer to our Surface Preparation and Pre-treatment Guide for Adhesives.

What's the difference between gel time, pot life, working time, and handling strength?

Gel time, pot life, and working time are properties that can vary greatly from product 
to product. These properties play an important role in product selection. Pot life and working life are often thought to be the same thing, but that is not always true. Pot life is defined as the amount of time it takes for an initial mixed viscosity to double, or quadruple for lower viscosity products. Timing starts from the moment the product is mixed, and is measured at room temperature (77°F/23˚C). 

Working life, on the other hand, is the amount of time the system remains low enough in viscosity that it can still be easily applied to a part or substrate. For this reason, working life can vary from application to application, and even by the application method of the adhesive, so there is no uniform method for quantifying this property.

Working life will also be greatly affected by the ambient temperature conditions.

Gel time is another term that is often used interchangeably with pot life, although there are some differences. Both terms are used to describe the thickening of a two component adhesive after it is mixed, but gel time is often tested at elevated temperatures as well. Gel time is determined by heating the mixed system and observing when it starts to become stringy, or gel-like, though not quite fully cured.

 

Handling Strength is the amount of time the adhesive takes to reach sufficient strength to be moved or lightly handled. The adhesive joint should not be overloaded or unduly stressed until full cure is reached. 145 psi (1 Mpa) lap shear strength is usually considered to be the minimum required before a bonded assembly can safely be handled.

Is there a risk to mixing a large amount of material all at once?

Yes, this is likely to result in material being wasted because a large mass will react quicker and there is the possibility that an exotherm can occur.

If I buy cartridges will I also need a gun to dispense it? Where can I buy one?

Yes, cartridges do require a dispensing gun and mixing nozzle. Huntsman cartridges comes with one mixing nozzle. Dispensing equipment and extra mixing nozzles can be purchased either from Huntsman or our distributors.

How does one properly apply the adhesive?

Please refer to our Surface Preparation and Pre-treatment Guide for Adhesives.


 

 

What do viscosity values mean? 


To put things into perspective, the viscosity of some  common household materials are given below:

Material Viscosity (cPs)
Water 1-5
Maple Syrup 150-200
Motor Oil SAE 40 250-500
Honey 2,000-3,000
Chocolate Syrup 1,000-25,000
Ketchup 50,000-70,000
Peanut Butter 150,000-200,000
Food Shortening or Lard 1,000,000-2,000-000
Caulking Compound 5,000,000-10,000,000

What does thixotropic mean? 


Thixotropy is the property of various gels of becoming fluid when subjected to a shearing force (as in stirring or shaking), but once left undisturbed, the material will return to a gel like consistency and not flow or sag.

What is Tg?

Tg is the Glass Transition Temperature. Tg is one of the most important properties of any polymeric material and is the temperature region where the polymer transitions from a hard, glassy material to a soft, rubbery material.

  • The adhesive chemistry that has been used to bond the parts (e.g. epoxy, polyurethane, methylmethacrylates etc.)
  • The size of the area that has been bonded and  its configuration
  • The substrate materials and how strong they are – whether the parts can withstand the de-bonding process without suffering any mechanical damage.
  • Sensitivity of other parts near the bond (sensitive electronics or weak plastics which could be damaged by heat or chemicals).

 

  • Find a TDS